soft-inthe-head

that and this

iolabsinc:


Paper Cuts is a curated print and fabrication project created by iolabs  featuring selected works by a variety of artists. The project serves as a vehicle to connect with the creative community to share fresh and innovative ways to execute printed editions, as well as exhibition and display options.

The process begins with a call for submissions, followed by iolabs’ family of artists and professionals selecting an image to feature for a specific project.

This spring of 2014, Paper Cuts is happy to announce our latest edition in collaboration with local artist Becca Stadtlander.

Becca’s dreamy illustrations, infused with the magic of the twilight hour, are printed with Ultrachrome inks on Belgian Linen and hung with natural string and stained wood dowels that beautifully complement the peaceful woodland atmosphere of her nightscapes. The prints are available individually or as a full set, measuring 16 x 10.5” or 24 x 18”. They can be purchased here.

Becca’s deeply colored and richly patterned compositions have been featured in The Saturday Evening Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, and O, The Oprah Magazine, to list a few, and her clients include Brown Publishing, Penguin, Random House, HarperCollins, and many more. Becca moved to New England in 2012 and currently seeks new inspiration for her artwork in Newport, Rhode Island, where she lives and freelances. See more of Becca’s work here.

failedprojects:

WIL MURRAY
The Yard Collage, 2012
Collage
11 × 9 in
27.9 × 22.9 cm

failedprojects:

WIL MURRAY

The Yard Collage, 2012

Collage

11 × 9 in

27.9 × 22.9 cm

funny little idea i’m working on

Sports fans have caused actual riots, but people still take sports seriously. Boy band fans scream at concerts, and suddenly they’re “a spectacle of the natural world.” Things that are made for women, particularly young women, are automatically given less respect. Girls who get interested in comic books or video games or science fiction get called “fake geek girls.”

Magazines and television and advertisements tell teenage girls that they should like certain things, and then other magazines tell girls that they’re stupid for liking those things. Then magazines publish articles and TV shows run specials wondering why teenage girls don’t have better self esteem, like they didn’t make it that way.

There’s nothing wrong with teenage girls being enthusiastic about boy bands or (heaven forbid) having sexual feelings about the boys in boy bands. There is something wrong with the way that other people react to teenage girls and their interests.

lucifelle:

EMPTIED GESTURES BY HEATHER HANSEN

LA, New Orleans-based Artist Heather Hansen (tumblr) - "Emptying Gestures is an experiment in kinetic drawing. In this series, I am searching for ways to download my movement directly onto paper, emptying gestures from one form to another and creating something new in the process."

Photos by Bryan Tarnowski

(Source: devidsketchbook, via chaudslapins)

War Kitties in Hammocks

Carriers and other vessels got infested with rodents. So cats were not just moral boosters (which they very much were) they were also working members of the crew. Some have even been immortalized for surviving multiple attacks on their ships, etc. Military dogs have been recognized for the important roles they’ve played but I think cats kinda get lost in the shuffle of military animals sometimes.

(Source: tkohl, via cosmicconnections)

The 15 Most Promising Photography BFA Grads of 2013: From SVA, Pratt, Parsons, MICA, and RISD

jamesgentile:

James Gentile

 forces family photos, staging stiff compositions out of friends and relatives in familiar places. Gentile challenges accepted notions of relationships between people, simultaneously trying to place himself within this structure through photography. The photos are warm and humorous, offering a fresh take on the family as subject.

My work has been featured in this article along with some of my colleagues :)

Soooo cool congrats guys!

artsfortransit:

Tracking time by the sun’s rays is the focus of Penelope Umbrico’s work as she amasses variations of one of the most recognizable images of the Terminal – light streaming through the windows and pooling on the Main Concourse floor, frequently referred to as the Grand Central “sun rays.” Umbrico made 512 C-prints of five different images, all found on various websites selling posters, postcards, “vintage” prints, and photographs. The repetition of the exact same image file on multiple sites,  as well as the variations in treatment such as cropping, flipping, graphic framing, color filters and “watermarks,”  creates a wholly new composition that prompts the viewer to take a closer look at how photography, memory and image making are joined and indexed. Her artwork, titled by the citation of each image, is currently on view in our exhibition, ON TIME/Grand Central at 100 in the NYT Museum Gallery in Grand Central Terminal.

Images:

Sunlight streams through the windows in the concourse at Grand Central Terminal in New York City in 1954. (AP Photo)

Penelope Umbrico, Five Photographs of Rays of Sunlight in Grand Central Station, Grand Central Terminal, 1903-1913, 1920, 1926, 1928, 1929, 1934, 1937, 1940, 1930-1940, 1935-1941, 1947, or 2010 by John Collier, Philip Gendreau Herbert, Edward Hulton…, 2013.

Artist Penelope Umbrico in front of her artwork.

(via failedprojects)